Governance

Co-Directors and Executive Committee

François Tanguay-Renaud, Co-Director

Associate Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School, and Member of the Graduate Faculty of the Department of Philosophy, York University
BCL, LLB (McGill), BCL, MPhil, DPhil (Oxon.), of the Bar of Ontario

François Tanguay-Renaud holds degrees in both civil and common law from McGill University, where he was both a Loran Scholar and a Greville-Smith Scholar. He also studied at the National University of Singapore, and completed his graduate work (BCL, MPhil, DPhil) at the University of Oxford, where he was in turn a Rhodes Scholar, holder of the Studentship of the Centre for Ethics and Philosophy of Law, as well as doctoral fellow of the Fonds québécois de la recherche sur la société et la culture and of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Prior to joining Osgoode, Professor Tanguay-Renaud was a Stipendiary Lecturer in Law at Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford. He also served as a law clerk to Justice Marie Deschamps of the Supreme Court of Canada, and worked with the Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development and the Asian Network for Free Elections in Thailand, as well as with the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan. Many of his professional activities continue to be international in nature. In the summer of 2009, he was a Visiting Professor at the National Law School of India University (NLSIU) in Bangalore and, in 2011, he returned to the University of Oxford as a H.L.A. Hart Visiting Fellow. More recently, he was also a Visiting Professor at the Centre for Ethics at the University of Toronto, Massey College, as well as the Robina Institute for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice at the University of Minnesota Law School. His current academic interests span a wide range of subject areas, such as criminal law, constitutional law, international law, emergencies and law, viewed mostly through the lens of analytical legal theory, as well as related areas of moral and political theory. He is also co-director of York’s Combined JD/MA in Philosophy Program, and a Member of the Editorial Committee for Transnational Legal Theory.

Professor Tanguay-Renaud started his association with Osgoode in 2006 when he came as a visiting scholar to help redesign the mandate of the Centre. He was Associate and then Acting Director of the Centre from July 2009 to July 2012, and was appointed as full Director in July 2012.

ftanguay-renaud@osgoode.yorku.ca

Heidi Matthews, Co-Director

Assistant Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School,
BA (Mount Allison), BCL/LLB (McGill), SJD (Harvard)

Professor Heidi Matthews researches and teaches in the areas of international criminal law, the law of war, international legal history and political theory. Her work theorizes contemporary shifts in the practice and discourse of the global legal regulation of political violence, with particular attention to history and gender, as well as political, critical and aesthetic theory.

Prior to joining Osgoode, Professor Matthews held a British Academy Newton International Fellowship at the SOAS School of Law, University of London. She served as a law clerk to the judges of the Appeals Chamber at the Special Court for Sierra Leone, and as an intern at the Immediate Office of the Prosecutor at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon. Her doctoral dissertation, “From Aggression to Atrocity: Interrogating the Jus in Bello Turn in International Criminal Law” was awarded Harvard Law School’s Laylin Prize. Professor Matthews has been a Fellow of the Institute for Global Law and Policy and a Clark Byse Fellow at Harvard Law School, as well as a Fellow at the Film Study Center, the Edmund J. Safra Center for Ethics, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University.

Professor Matthews’ current projects include a critical legal evaluation of American, Canadian and British counterinsurgency policy and practice, a reevaluation of the role of international criminal law during the Cold War, and an intellectual and political history of the concept of military necessity in international law. She is also working on a research and documentary film project that examines narratives of Allied sexual violence perpetrated against German women at the end of World War II. Professor Matthews is active in several international research networks, including the Critical Approaches to International Criminal Law and Cold War International Law projects.

Research interests: International Criminal Law; Law of War/International Humanitarian Law; Public International Law; International Human Rights Law; Feminist, Legal and Political Theory; Law and the Arts.

hmatthews@osgoode.yorku.ca

Margaret E. Beare

Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School
BA, MA (Guelph), Diploma in Criminology (Cambridge), PhD (Columbia) (joint-appointed with the Department of Sociology, York University)

Professor Margaret Beare’s career combines academic teaching with research and policy development. Her research interests are transnationalization of crime and law enforcement; public and private policing; organized crime; women and the criminal justice system; money laundering; public policing strategies and corrections. Former Director of the Jack and Mae Nathanson Centre for the Study of Organized Crime and Corruption, Professor Beare has been involved in police research for more than 20 years. She served 11 years with the Department of the Solicitor General Canada–two years as Director of Police Policy and Research. Her book, Criminal Conspiracies: Organized Crime in Canada (Toronto: Nelson Canada, 1996), was the first academic book to look at organized crime in Canada and to trace the development of the concept and the legislation, and remains the point of reference for scholarship in the field.  Her edited book, entitled Critical Reflections on Transnational Organized Crime, Money Laundering, and Corruption, was published in 2003 by University of Toronto Press. Two more books were also published by U of T Press in the Spring of 2007. Money Laundering in Canada: The Chasing of Dirty and Dangerous Dollars is a follow-up to a 1990 report entitled Tracing of Illicit Funds: Money Laundering in Canada that she co-authored with Stephen Schneider. The second book is a co-edited manuscript pertaining to police independence entitled Police and Government Relations: Who’s Calling the Shots. During 2015 she published two new books–a new edition of Criminal Conspiracies: Organized Crime in Canada (Oxford Press), and a co-edited book titled Putting the State on Trial: The Policing of Protest During the G20 Summit (UBC Press).

Research Interests: Policing, transnational crime and enforcement, money laundering and research related to the functioning of the criminal justice system

mbeare@osgoode.yorku.ca

Craig Scott

Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School
BA (McGill), BA (Oxford), LLM (London School of Economics), LLB (Dalhousie), of the Bar of Ontario

Professor Craig Scott joined Osgoode Hall Law School in 2000, following twelve year as member of the Faculty of Law of the University of Toronto. On March 19, 2012, he was elected as the New Democratic Party candidate in a federal by-election in Toronto—Danforth, and is currently serving as a Member of Parliament for that riding.

Professor Scott’s teaching and research were primarily in the fields of public international law and private international law, with a focus on the place of international human rights law in both of these fields. His most recent work draws on all three of these fields, including a growing focus on transnational corporate accountability. He also worked extensively on the theory and doctrine of economic, social and cultural rights, as well as on constitutional rights protection in Canada and abroad.

He was the series editor of the Hart Monographs in Transnational and International Law, and Founding Editor of Transnational Legal Theory. He also edited the collection Torture as Tort: Comparative Perspectives on the Development of Transnational Human Rights Litigation.